September 17, 2019

Battle of Lexington and Concord


Battle of Lexington and Concord

Battle of Lexington and Concord

The Battle of Lexington and Concord is part 8 of “Revisiting the American Revolution History,” my lead up to the Fourth of July celebration. Often referred to as the “Shot Heard Around the World,” the first shots of the American Revolution were fired at Lexington, Massachusetts. The British were concerned of a rebellion by the colonists and sent 700 soldiers to destroy munitions the colonists had stored in Concord. The colonists learned of the plan, and in the now famous “Midnight Ride of Paul Revere,” he road his horse from Boston to Lexington to warn that the British were coming. On April 19, 1775, British troops entered Lexington and seventy seven militiamen stood to face them. Someone fired a shot, and the British soldiers started firing. Eight militiamen were killed and ten wounded, and the remainder dispersed. The British troops then marched on Concord. By this time, 400 militia had assembled, and a further battle ensued. After searching the town, the British troops marched back to Boston with the militia battling them along the way. Eventually, over 15,000 colonial militia converged on Boston, surrounding the city and beginning the Siege of Boston.

Check out these links to learn more about the Battle of Lexington and Concord, including a Battle of Lexington and Concord video collection.

In the next session, I’ll talk about the Second Continental Congress.

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